Concrete Lifting and Leveling Experts

Before & After Photos of Concrete Restoration Projects in Winnipeg

Newer home - Driveway near the garage and front step

during
During
This shows a job in process. Note the drop in front of the garage and under the front step and the rusted off rebar protruding from the garage floor. Note also the limestone grout that has bubbled up a bit at each of the holes through the slab while the job is in process. Small amounts are pumped into each hole in sequence filling the space below and raising the slab evenly. As the slab is lifted over the course of several hours the backpressure from below decreases and very little grout is pushed back out of the hole. The lifting process is fascinating to watch and surprisingly simple.
After
The slab is fully restored to the original level closing the gap under the front step and matching the level of the garage floor. The holes have been finished with concrete to match the existing slab. The large void under the front step was also filled to prevent future soil erosion.

Typical attached garage floor

garagefloor
Before
Attached garage slabs are “floating slabs” poured within a perimeter concrete grade beam. The front edge of the slab under the garage door is poured over the indented portion of the grade beam and so the floor does not settle at this point even though it is typically hollow there. Settlement of the slab usually occurs most along the house foundation were the basement backfill is least compacted. In many newer garages the floor is pinned into the basement foundation with steel reinforcing to prevent this problem. In those cases, the space beneath the slab becomes hollow as the ground settles out and the floor sags in the center and eventually even breaks away from the steel reinforcing along the edges.   
After
Our solution involves filling all the hollow spaces under the slab and raising the slab back to the original level. It is not unusual to encounter 6 to 12 inches of void under a garage floor or to hear stories of garage floors that collapsed suddenly when the slab cracked or the steel reinforcing rusted away. In this case the floor had settled gradually over time and was restored back to the original level.

Newer home – front step approach

Front Step Approach
Before
This is another good example of sidewalk settlement in newer developments. Again, the reason is improper compaction of the basement backfill compounded by inadequate backfill under the front step. Over time the soil settles and erodes into the depression under the front step. As rainwater flows toward that area it sinks further and increases the risk of damage to the foundation and weeping tiles. In this instance the sidewalk slab was attached to the house along one side but it is evident where the steel rebar broke allowing the whole sidewalk to sink.   
After
Our solution in this situation was to first fill the hollow space under the front step up to above grade level to prevent any future erosion into that area. We then injected limestone grout under the slab to fill any voids and to raise the slab back to the original level with a gentle slope away from the house. Note that the limestone grout has not yet been removed from the injection holes and the holes finished with matching concrete. That is typically done by a separate finishing crew several days after the lift is completed.

Newer home – driveway in front of garage

Before and After - Garage
Before
This again is a very typical problem in newer developments with front driveways. The cause is inadequate compaction of the subsoil prior to placement of the driveway. The problem is often hidden for several years because steel rebar reinforcing is used to attach the driveway to the garage floor. Over time the steel reinforcing rusts away or breaks free from the concrete and the driveway settles down to the level of the sunken base materials. Note the locations of the rebar along the face of the garage floor that first broke out the bottom of the garage floor pad and then rusted away.
After
Again, our solution to this problem was to inject limestone grout under the slab to provide a stable permanent base for the driveway and to raise it back to the original level. On rare occasions if the subsoil is still settling the driveway may again settle a slight amount. Our warranty provides for a free relift in the event of any such resettlement of more than ½ inch.

Newer home – front step approach

banda-frontsteps

Before
This is a very typical sidewalk settlement that occurs in newer developments. The reason again is improper compaction of the basement backfill. The problem is usually compounded by inadequate backfill under the front step. Over time the soil settles and erodes into that empty space. As the ground now slopes toward the house rainwater flows into that space and increases the risk of damage to the foundation and plugging of the weeping tiles from eroding soil.   
After
We solved this problem by filling the depression under the front step up to above grade level to prevent any future erosion into that area. We then injected limestone grout under the slab to fill any voids and to raise the slab back to the original level with a slope away from the house. Note that the holes we drilled through the sidewalk have been freshly repaired with new concrete that will cure over time to match the sidewalk slab

Older home – driveway and front step approach

beforeandafter1-drivewaysteps

Before

This is a typical older home with a concrete driveway and front step approach that have sunk adjacent to the house. The ground around the house settled because the backfill from the original basement excavation was inadequately compacted before the concrete was poured. The problem is that water now drains against the foundation instead of away from the house. This can result in foundation cracks when saturated soils freeze in the winter and seepage through the basement walls in the summer.

After

By filling the settled out space with our limestone grout we have created a solid permanent base for the concrete slabs and have raised them back to the original level with slope away from the house. We guaranted that the desired results wouldl be achieved and we warranty that no further settlement will occur. A common concern of homeowners with this type of job is the possible damage to the foundation as the slab is being raised. There is absolutely no risk of foundation damage. In the thousands of jobs we have done we have never had any situation in which the foundation was affected.